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At first (or even second) glance, it’s an unlikely pairing. He’s the elegant, gentlemanly jazz icon who left his heart in San Francisco, singing classics from the Great American Songbook. She’s the dance-pop sensation known for flamboyant costumes (a meat dress, a Kermit the Frog jacket), fame-themed hits (“Paparazzi,” “Applause”), and fans dubbed Little Monsters. Yet Tony Bennett, 88, and Lady Gaga, 28, actually have a lot in common. They’re both proud Italian-American New Yorkers who cherish family; they’ve sold millions of albums, won multiple Grammys, and weathered career ups and downs; they even live near each other on Manhattan’s Central Park South. And they share a love of the music written by American masters like Duke Ellington, Cole Porter, and Irving Berlin that has resulted in a close friendship and a tuneful collaboration.

Their first musical partnership was a sassy take on “The Lady Is a Tramp” in 2011. Now Tony and Lady (as they call each other) have recorded an album, Cheek to Cheek, due Sept. 23; highlights include buoyant duets on “Anything Goes” and the title track, as well as powerful solo renditions of “Sophisticated Lady” (his) and “Lush Life” (hers). “These songs never go out of style,” Bennett says. “Like a good black dress!” adds Lady Gaga (née Stefani Germanotta). The duo sat down in his art studio (Bennett is an accomplished painter and watercolorist; the home he shares with his wife of seven years, Susan Crow, is nearby) to talk about music and how he helped her through a troubling time when, she says, “I didn’t even want to sing anymore.”

PARADE: How did you two meet?

TONY BENNETT: At a benefit concert. It was the first time I heard Lady perform, and I could not believe the audience’s reaction. I went backstage, and she was there with her parents.

LADY GAGA: I walked offstage sweating, and they said, “Mr. Tony Bennett wants to meet you.” My father got all choked up, and my mother said, “Oh, I need to fix my hair!” We all had champagne. I was so happy to meet him.

TB: The first thing I said was, “Let’s do an album together.” And she said, “Okay.” That quick. I just love what she did on this album. She’s up there with Ella Fitzgerald, who was the greatest singer in the world.

LG: Working with Tony has reaffirmed everything I knew but that you start to forget when your life changes and it gets really noisy. For ­Tony, it’s all about great music.

How did you each start out in music?

TB: I attended the American Theatre Wing School in New York [after serving in combat in World War II]. The first thing they taught me is to only sing quality—intelligent songs. Never treat the audience disrespectfully. It was a wonderful lesson. I had a teacher on 52nd Street, Mimi Spear; she said to me, “Don’t imitate another singer, because you’ll just be one of the chorus if you do. To learn how to phrase, study musicians—a piano player, a saxophone player—and see how they’re phrasing.” I took her advice. It sounds so simple, but if you just be yourself, you’re different than anyone else.

LG: I studied art history and music at NYU. After one year, I said, “I already know about music. I need to go out and play it.” My parents were very mad at me. I said, “Just give me a year to make something happen.” And I got jobs—a coatroom girl, a waitress. Were you a singing waiter, Tony?

TB: [laughs] Oh, yeah. We did the same thing!

LG: I tried to get gigs downtown, and after a few years I had a little following. Then some people tried to control me. On my earlier records they wanted to make my voice more electronic and auto-tuned for radio. That’s why this album with Tony is so amazing, because he’s hearing me sing raw, without any of that. And he’s protecting me from people trying to control what I sound like.

Tony, you sang in jazz clubs. But Lady Gaga, when you started making it, you had to fill stadiums, right? 

LG: I didn’t have to, but I feel fortunate that my first album [2008’s The Fame] sold 17 million. Who knows why? [laughs] Yes, we filled stadiums, but that doesn’t mean it will last a lifetime.

You don’t believe it will?

LG: I want it to. I have to make music; I love it.

You both became famous early on. Why was fame important to you? 

TB: My ambition was to help my mother after my father died [when Bennett was 10]. She was raising three children, working [as a seamstress] for a penny a dress. Fortunately, my first hit record became so big I was able to transplant my mother into nature in Englewood, New Jersey.

LG: Tony, you’re such a good man. So sweet! You sound like my boyfriend, Taylor [actor Taylor Kinney]. He always says, “I just want to make it for my mom.” I feel the same way.

On Cheek to Cheek, Lady Gaga, you sing a poignant jazz classic, “Lush Life.”

TB: Lady said, “That’s one song I have to do.” She nailed it. You can hear her whole life in it.

LG: When I was 13, I’d sing [that song] with the Regis High School boys’ choir. I didn’t understand what the lyrics were about, but I understood the melody in a very intense way. Now I know everything that song is about. When I sang it [on this album] for the first time in 15 years, I started crying. I came into the control room, had my whiskey, and Tony held me and I cried in his arms. I kept saying, “Am I a mess, Tony? I don’t want to be a mess. I want to make you proud.” He said, “No, you’re not a mess. You’re a sophisticated lady.”

“Lush Life” is about loss, failure, and heartache. Did the song hit you as hard as it did because you’ve had some problems recently? [Lady Gaga had hip surgery last year and in November ­parted ways with her manager.]

LG: It’s heartbreaking. Six months ago I didn’t even want to sing anymore.

TB: Do you know what Duke Ellington said? He said, “Number one, don’t quit. Number two, listen to number one.”

LG: Right! The other day, Tony said, “I’ve ­never once in my career not wanted to do this.” It stung. Six months ago I didn’t feel that way. I tell Tony every day that he saved my life.

You felt like giving up? Why?

LG: I’m not going to say any names, but people get irrational when it comes to ­money—with how they treat you, with what they expect from you. … But if you help an artist, it doesn’t give you the right, once the artist is big, to take advantage of them. … I was so sad. I couldn’t sleep. I felt dead. And then I spent a lot of time with Tony. He wanted nothing but my friendship and my voice. [She begins to cry.]

TB: [quietly] I understand. [He holds her hand.]

LG: It meant a lot to me, Tony. I don’t have many people I can relate to.

People you can relate to, or people you can trust?

LG: Both.

How do famous people know if someone truly loves them and isn’t just using them?

TB: Well, you stay close to your family. Lady does. That’s what I did. [In 1979, Bennett’s career and finances were in turmoil, and his sons helped him turn things around.] I made a very good move when I said, “I’m going to have my son [Danny] manage me.” My other son [Dae] is my engineer on my ­recordings—he’s fantastic.

LG: What Tony’s trying to say in a nice way is that you can’t trust anybody.

No one?

LG: You can trust your family. You know, there were people I was sure were my friends. … I’m still learning. Now I’m a lot more careful.

TB: I have a great friend from when I was a singing waiter in Astoria [in Queens]. He has a little group that plays on Thursdays in a restaurant there. He’s still the same guy; I’m still the same. It has nothing to do with fame or success. He’s just happy to see me. And that’s the real thing.

What’s the most important thing you’ve learned from each other? 

TB: Nobody has communicated with the public more than Lady Gaga. Ever. I trust the audience, and I’m very impressed. As far as they’re concerned, she’s part of their family. The only guy who ever did that was Bing Crosby, years ago.

What have you learned from Tony?

LG: That it’s important to stay true to yourself. When I came into this with Tony, he didn’t say, “You’ve got to take off all the crazy outfits and just sing.” He said, “Be yourself.”… You know, people wrote a lot of things about my last album, Artpop, which was very controversial. If it didn’t grab the whole world the way The Fame Monster did, that’s okay, because I know it’s good. That’s what Tony has taught me, that my intuition is right. When he talks about the 66 albums he’s put out, the peaks and valleys, and how it’s not about having a hit record—it’s the most inspiring thing.

Parade.com


Lady Gaga by Sebastian Faena for Harper’s Bazaar Arabia, September 2014

Lady Gaga by Sebastian Faena for Harper’s Bazaar Arabia, September 2014


EAU DE GAGA - For the adventurous woman and the man who loves her
Release Dates: 
Italy, Poland, & Czech Republic - September 1st, 2014
UK, Spain, & Germany - September 15th, 2014
USA - January 15th, 2015
Russia, France, & Canada - TBA
Check out Haus Laboratories for more information. 

EAU DE GAGA - For the adventurous woman and the man who loves her

Release Dates: 

  • Italy, Poland, & Czech Republic - September 1st, 2014
  • UK, Spain, & Germany - September 15th, 2014
  • USA - January 15th, 2015
  • Russia, France, & Canada - TBA

Check out Haus Laboratories for more information. 

First promotional image for Lady Gaga’s second perfume EAU DE GAGA

Lady Gaga and Coty introduce EAU DE GAGA. Created with Gaga’s visionary fragrance powerhouse, Haus Laboratories, this exciting new scent captures the pure essence of Gaga. Dangerously daring, EAU DE GAGA represents the future of a scent that appeals to both men and women; nothing is off-limits.

EAU DE GAGA is an enigmatic scent, fusing daringly diverse elements to create a beguiling allure. The fragrance is built around a beautiful heart of white violet, an intoxicating flower that fuses male and female attractions. To counterbalance this opulent woody-floral intensity, the scent opens with an invigorating burst of sparkling lime that exudes dynamic vibrancy. And it evolves into a sensual trail based on leather, adding a primal quality to the scent.

The striking EAU DE GAGA bottle mirrors the perfume by uniting masculine and feminine design aesthetics. Its stark lines and sleek black lacquered finish deliver a bold statement in simplicity. For an added touch of luxury, the front of the flacon is adorned with a silver name plate that is printed with the words “Paris – New York” and the number 001. The names of the two cities reflect Haus Laboratories’ global identity and the number 001 represents the beginning of a long story, one which is still to be continued. And for the most devoted Little Monsters, the Ultimate Masterpiece 75ml version comes in an elegant red folding jewelry box in which the bottle rests on a sumptuous black velvet.

Like the campaign for Lady Gaga Fame, the EAU DE GAGA campaign was shot by Steven Klein and stars Gaga herself. EAU DE GAGA Eau de Parfum 15ml, 30ml, 50ml and 75ml will be available at retailers worldwide from September 2014.

ladygaganow

Behind the scenes of Lady Gaga by Sebastian Faena for Harper’s Bazaar, September 2014

Lady Gaga by Sebastian Faena for Harper’s Bazaar, September 2014

inezandvinoodh:

Unpublished portrait of our story with @ladygaga for @portermagazine ! So excited to see the concert tonight at roseland. For now watch our video here http://youtu.be/I4pJ2Rf3j0A (this is why we love this girl!) Kisses iv

inezandvinoodh:

Unpublished portrait of our story with @ladygaga for @portermagazine ! So excited to see the concert tonight at roseland. For now watch our video here http://youtu.be/I4pJ2Rf3j0A (this is why we love this girl!) Kisses iv


@PORTERmagazine: An unseen shot from inside our @LadyGaga cover story. On sale April 4. #GagaForPORTTER 

@PORTERmagazine: An unseen shot from inside our @LadyGaga cover story. On sale April 4. #GagaForPORTTER 

New photo from Lady Gaga’s Versace campaign photoshoot.

New photo from Lady Gaga’s Versace campaign photoshoot.

ourgirlladygaga:

HQ Outtake: Lady Gaga by Mariano Vivanco (2011)

ourgirlladygaga:

HQ Outtake: Lady Gaga by Mariano Vivanco (2011)


Lady Gaga is featured in photographer Annie Leibovitz’s upcoming self titled book, which will be released through TASCHEN in March. The book, which features over 40 years of work from Leibovitz, is part of TASCHEN’s SUMO book series. The series also includes releases from David Lachapelle, Helmut Newton, and Nobuyoshi Araki is made up of collected works by the photographer. The SUMO book weighs nearly 60 pounds, has 476 pages with text describing each image. The set is limited to a total of 10,000 signed and numbered copies, and can also be bought as a Collector’s Edition and also an Art Edition.
Annie “drew from over 40 years of work, starting with the viscerally intimate reportage she created for Rolling Stone magazine in the 1970s and extending through the more stylized portraiture of her work for Vanity Fair and Vogue,” according to TASCHEN.
Read more: http://www.propagaga.com/

For more information on the book, and where you can get it, please visit the TASCHEN website!

Lady Gaga is featured in photographer Annie Leibovitz’s upcoming self titled book, which will be released through TASCHEN in March. The book, which features over 40 years of work from Leibovitz, is part of TASCHEN’s SUMO book series. The series also includes releases from David Lachapelle, Helmut Newton, and Nobuyoshi Araki is made up of collected works by the photographer. The SUMO book weighs nearly 60 pounds, has 476 pages with text describing each image. The set is limited to a total of 10,000 signed and numbered copies, and can also be bought as a Collector’s Edition and also an Art Edition.

Annie “drew from over 40 years of work, starting with the viscerally intimate reportage she created for Rolling Stone magazine in the 1970s and extending through the more stylized portraiture of her work for Vanity Fair and Vogue,” according to TASCHEN.

Read more: http://www.propagaga.com/

For more information on the book, and where you can get it, please visit the TASCHEN website!

This album is a celebration. My pain exploding in electronic music. It’s heavy, but after I listen to it, I feel happy again, I feel lighter.


It’s not always easy being Lady Gaga—and in 2013, it was especially difficult. For the first time since she emerged from the New York City club ether in 2008, Planet Gaga seemed in peril. Her latest album, ARTPOP, an experimental R&B-tinged effort featuring artwork by Jeff Koons and a controversial duet with R. Kelly, divided critics. She also endured a very public split with her longtime manager, Troy Carter, just a week before the album’s release in November—all of which seemed to knock Gaga out of orbit. But 2014 is a new year, and Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta is a space oddity of a pop star. After a brief break around the holidays and some well-documented quality time with her boyfriend, Chicago Fire actor Taylor Kinney (and sporting some remarkable early-winter pantless ‘n’ plaid looks), Gaga is back to being her most inimitably Gaga, with a sparkling new Versace campaign and her upcoming ArtRave tour, which launches later this spring.
How does one account for such resilience, such triumphant unflappability, in the face of turmoil? Bazaar drew up a Proustian little Gaga questionnaire designed to reveal some of the secrets of her extraordinary Gaga-ness. The Lady kindly obliged by answering honestly and fabulously—and she did not disappoint.
HARPER’S BAZAAR: How have you changed in the past few years?
LADY GAGA: I’m actually not very different at all. I work all day, do research, sketch my ideas, prepare for performances. My experience with fame has been the opposite: “How can I stop this from changing me?” I mean I’m not broke anymore—that’s good! But today I’m more comfortable with being who I am. When I was younger, I felt pressure to become someone else once I became successful. But it’s the intention of the work that’s changed. I have fans now. I have a new purpose: to remind them that I am one of them, that we are one another. My consciousness has changed.
HB: What was the first big musical moment in your life?
LG: I went to see Phantom of the Opera with my grandma and my mom when I was very little. The stage, the voice, the music?…Composer Andrew Lloyd Webber has been a massive inspiration to me for some time—the storytelling, that deliciously somber undertone in his music. I just knew that he could see it while he was creating it. It is the same way I experience music.
HB: What’s your favorite outfit of all time?
LG: Audrey Hepburn at the derby in My Fair Lady—the giant white hat with flower detail and bonnet, a mermaid lace gown with a giant bow, and a walking stick. I’ve loved that since I was little. I’ll design something like that one day.
HB: Do you keep a lot of clothes that you’ve worn over the years?
LG: The fashion I’ve acquired over the years is so sacred to me—from costumes to couture, high fashion to punk wear I’ve collected from my secret international hot spots. I keep everything in an enormous archive in Hollywood. The clothes are on mannequins, also on hangers and in boxes with a photo of each piece, and there’s a Web site where I can go to look through everything. It’s too big—I could never sort through it myself! But these garments tell the stories of my life. And then there are the tour pieces. This is the section that is most sacred to me. These are the pieces that have collected energy, joy, and screams from fans all over the world. My fashion is my most prized possession for two reasons: 1) because it is a visualization of all the hard work I’ve put in to get where I am today; 2) because it is a legend to the encyclopedia of my life. It is exactly what I’ve aimed to seep into the artistic consciousness of people all over the world—that life is an art form.
HB: What is your home like?
LG: My “home” is a controversial topic. I don’t exactly have one. I live all over the world. I keep a small rental in New York, where I hang many of my hats when I come to see my parents and New York pals. It’s like a tiny jewel box, covered in rose-gold mirrors, with an oversize pink couch, an expensive vase, a white Marilyn piano, and a boudoir. I do not keep a lot of clothes here—mostly punk wear. And the three most expensive items I’ve ever purchased, including an actual house: my sable, a strand of diamonds, and my Mikimoto pearls.
HB: How do you think people in the future will feel about fashion right now?
LG: I’m not sure. I imagine that there will be a revival of some of these aesthetics—the more bold ones. Those who have watered down themselves for “sale” might make money now, but they are shortchanging their legend. I always think to myself, How do I want to be remembered? I don’t want to be remembered as anything but brave. The only good intention to make money is to help others. I want to be Oprah. I want to be Melinda Gates. If I ever sell products other than my talents, then it will be to give more to others.
HB: What excites you about the idea of performing in space?
LG: I honestly can’t wait. I can’t wait to design the performance. I’m auctioning off my second seat [on a Virgin Galactic flight] to raise money for the Born This Way Foundation. I want to make a moment that is about much more than me. Performing in space is such an honor. I want to challenge myself to come up with something that will not only bring everyone together but will also have a message of love that blasts into the beyond.

Read the full interview here: http://www.harpersbazaar.com/celebrity/news/lady-gaga-interview-0314

It’s not always easy being Lady Gaga—and in 2013, it was especially difficult. For the first time since she emerged from the New York City club ether in 2008, Planet Gaga seemed in peril. Her latest album, ARTPOP, an experimental R&B-tinged effort featuring artwork by Jeff Koons and a controversial duet with R. Kelly, divided critics. She also endured a very public split with her longtime manager, Troy Carter, just a week before the album’s release in November—all of which seemed to knock Gaga out of orbit. But 2014 is a new year, and Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta is a space oddity of a pop star. After a brief break around the holidays and some well-documented quality time with her boyfriend, Chicago Fire actor Taylor Kinney (and sporting some remarkable early-winter pantless ‘n’ plaid looks), Gaga is back to being her most inimitably Gaga, with a sparkling new Versace campaign and her upcoming ArtRave tour, which launches later this spring.

How does one account for such resilience, such triumphant unflappability, in the face of turmoil? Bazaar drew up a Proustian little Gaga questionnaire designed to reveal some of the secrets of her extraordinary Gaga-ness. The Lady kindly obliged by answering honestly and fabulously—and she did not disappoint.

HARPER’S BAZAAR: How have you changed in the past few years?

LADY GAGA: I’m actually not very different at all. I work all day, do research, sketch my ideas, prepare for performances. My experience with fame has been the opposite: “How can I stop this from changing me?” I mean I’m not broke anymore—that’s good! But today I’m more comfortable with being who I am. When I was younger, I felt pressure to become someone else once I became successful. But it’s the intention of the work that’s changed. I have fans now. I have a new purpose: to remind them that I am one of them, that we are one another. My consciousness has changed.

HB: What was the first big musical moment in your life?

LG: I went to see Phantom of the Opera with my grandma and my mom when I was very little. The stage, the voice, the music?…Composer Andrew Lloyd Webber has been a massive inspiration to me for some time—the storytelling, that deliciously somber undertone in his music. I just knew that he could see it while he was creating it. It is the same way I experience music.

HB: What’s your favorite outfit of all time?

LG: Audrey Hepburn at the derby in My Fair Lady—the giant white hat with flower detail and bonnet, a mermaid lace gown with a giant bow, and a walking stick. I’ve loved that since I was little. I’ll design something like that one day.

HB: Do you keep a lot of clothes that you’ve worn over the years?

LG: The fashion I’ve acquired over the years is so sacred to me—from costumes to couture, high fashion to punk wear I’ve collected from my secret international hot spots. I keep everything in an enormous archive in Hollywood. The clothes are on mannequins, also on hangers and in boxes with a photo of each piece, and there’s a Web site where I can go to look through everything. It’s too big—I could never sort through it myself! But these garments tell the stories of my life. And then there are the tour pieces. This is the section that is most sacred to me. These are the pieces that have collected energy, joy, and screams from fans all over the world. My fashion is my most prized possession for two reasons: 1) because it is a visualization of all the hard work I’ve put in to get where I am today; 2) because it is a legend to the encyclopedia of my life. It is exactly what I’ve aimed to seep into the artistic consciousness of people all over the world—that life is an art form.

HB: What is your home like?

LG: My “home” is a controversial topic. I don’t exactly have one. I live all over the world. I keep a small rental in New York, where I hang many of my hats when I come to see my parents and New York pals. It’s like a tiny jewel box, covered in rose-gold mirrors, with an oversize pink couch, an expensive vase, a white Marilyn piano, and a boudoir. I do not keep a lot of clothes here—mostly punk wear. And the three most expensive items I’ve ever purchased, including an actual house: my sable, a strand of diamonds, and my Mikimoto pearls.

HB: How do you think people in the future will feel about fashion right now?

LG: I’m not sure. I imagine that there will be a revival of some of these aesthetics—the more bold ones. Those who have watered down themselves for “sale” might make money now, but they are shortchanging their legend. I always think to myself, How do I want to be remembered? I don’t want to be remembered as anything but brave. The only good intention to make money is to help others. I want to be Oprah. I want to be Melinda Gates. If I ever sell products other than my talents, then it will be to give more to others.

HB: What excites you about the idea of performing in space?

LG: I honestly can’t wait. I can’t wait to design the performance. I’m auctioning off my second seat [on a Virgin Galactic flight] to raise money for the Born This Way Foundation. I want to make a moment that is about much more than me. Performing in space is such an honor. I want to challenge myself to come up with something that will not only bring everyone together but will also have a message of love that blasts into the beyond.

Read the full interview here: http://www.harpersbazaar.com/celebrity/news/lady-gaga-interview-0314

Gaga’s photo spread in the March issue of Harper’s Bazaar.