Opened in 2010, LadyxGaga was created with Monsters in mind. From new candid photos to the latest Gaga videos, we strive to keep you updated on everything Gaga all day long. Our team's aim is to bring you the best content and most reliable information because we take pride in being the go-to site for your Gaga fix. Map
inezandvinoodh:

Unpublished portrait of our story with @ladygaga for @portermagazine ! So excited to see the concert tonight at roseland. For now watch our video here http://youtu.be/I4pJ2Rf3j0A (this is why we love this girl!) Kisses iv

inezandvinoodh:

Unpublished portrait of our story with @ladygaga for @portermagazine ! So excited to see the concert tonight at roseland. For now watch our video here http://youtu.be/I4pJ2Rf3j0A (this is why we love this girl!) Kisses iv


@PORTERmagazine: An unseen shot from inside our @LadyGaga cover story. On sale April 4. #GagaForPORTTER 

@PORTERmagazine: An unseen shot from inside our @LadyGaga cover story. On sale April 4. #GagaForPORTTER 

New photo from Lady Gaga’s Versace campaign photoshoot.

New photo from Lady Gaga’s Versace campaign photoshoot.

ourgirlladygaga:

HQ Outtake: Lady Gaga by Mariano Vivanco (2011)

ourgirlladygaga:

HQ Outtake: Lady Gaga by Mariano Vivanco (2011)


Lady Gaga is featured in photographer Annie Leibovitz’s upcoming self titled book, which will be released through TASCHEN in March. The book, which features over 40 years of work from Leibovitz, is part of TASCHEN’s SUMO book series. The series also includes releases from David Lachapelle, Helmut Newton, and Nobuyoshi Araki is made up of collected works by the photographer. The SUMO book weighs nearly 60 pounds, has 476 pages with text describing each image. The set is limited to a total of 10,000 signed and numbered copies, and can also be bought as a Collector’s Edition and also an Art Edition.
Annie “drew from over 40 years of work, starting with the viscerally intimate reportage she created for Rolling Stone magazine in the 1970s and extending through the more stylized portraiture of her work for Vanity Fair and Vogue,” according to TASCHEN.
Read more: http://www.propagaga.com/

For more information on the book, and where you can get it, please visit the TASCHEN website!

Lady Gaga is featured in photographer Annie Leibovitz’s upcoming self titled book, which will be released through TASCHEN in March. The book, which features over 40 years of work from Leibovitz, is part of TASCHEN’s SUMO book series. The series also includes releases from David Lachapelle, Helmut Newton, and Nobuyoshi Araki is made up of collected works by the photographer. The SUMO book weighs nearly 60 pounds, has 476 pages with text describing each image. The set is limited to a total of 10,000 signed and numbered copies, and can also be bought as a Collector’s Edition and also an Art Edition.

Annie “drew from over 40 years of work, starting with the viscerally intimate reportage she created for Rolling Stone magazine in the 1970s and extending through the more stylized portraiture of her work for Vanity Fair and Vogue,” according to TASCHEN.

Read more: http://www.propagaga.com/

For more information on the book, and where you can get it, please visit the TASCHEN website!

This album is a celebration. My pain exploding in electronic music. It’s heavy, but after I listen to it, I feel happy again, I feel lighter.


It’s not always easy being Lady Gaga—and in 2013, it was especially difficult. For the first time since she emerged from the New York City club ether in 2008, Planet Gaga seemed in peril. Her latest album, ARTPOP, an experimental R&B-tinged effort featuring artwork by Jeff Koons and a controversial duet with R. Kelly, divided critics. She also endured a very public split with her longtime manager, Troy Carter, just a week before the album’s release in November—all of which seemed to knock Gaga out of orbit. But 2014 is a new year, and Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta is a space oddity of a pop star. After a brief break around the holidays and some well-documented quality time with her boyfriend, Chicago Fire actor Taylor Kinney (and sporting some remarkable early-winter pantless ‘n’ plaid looks), Gaga is back to being her most inimitably Gaga, with a sparkling new Versace campaign and her upcoming ArtRave tour, which launches later this spring.
How does one account for such resilience, such triumphant unflappability, in the face of turmoil? Bazaar drew up a Proustian little Gaga questionnaire designed to reveal some of the secrets of her extraordinary Gaga-ness. The Lady kindly obliged by answering honestly and fabulously—and she did not disappoint.
HARPER’S BAZAAR: How have you changed in the past few years?
LADY GAGA: I’m actually not very different at all. I work all day, do research, sketch my ideas, prepare for performances. My experience with fame has been the opposite: “How can I stop this from changing me?” I mean I’m not broke anymore—that’s good! But today I’m more comfortable with being who I am. When I was younger, I felt pressure to become someone else once I became successful. But it’s the intention of the work that’s changed. I have fans now. I have a new purpose: to remind them that I am one of them, that we are one another. My consciousness has changed.
HB: What was the first big musical moment in your life?
LG: I went to see Phantom of the Opera with my grandma and my mom when I was very little. The stage, the voice, the music?…Composer Andrew Lloyd Webber has been a massive inspiration to me for some time—the storytelling, that deliciously somber undertone in his music. I just knew that he could see it while he was creating it. It is the same way I experience music.
HB: What’s your favorite outfit of all time?
LG: Audrey Hepburn at the derby in My Fair Lady—the giant white hat with flower detail and bonnet, a mermaid lace gown with a giant bow, and a walking stick. I’ve loved that since I was little. I’ll design something like that one day.
HB: Do you keep a lot of clothes that you’ve worn over the years?
LG: The fashion I’ve acquired over the years is so sacred to me—from costumes to couture, high fashion to punk wear I’ve collected from my secret international hot spots. I keep everything in an enormous archive in Hollywood. The clothes are on mannequins, also on hangers and in boxes with a photo of each piece, and there’s a Web site where I can go to look through everything. It’s too big—I could never sort through it myself! But these garments tell the stories of my life. And then there are the tour pieces. This is the section that is most sacred to me. These are the pieces that have collected energy, joy, and screams from fans all over the world. My fashion is my most prized possession for two reasons: 1) because it is a visualization of all the hard work I’ve put in to get where I am today; 2) because it is a legend to the encyclopedia of my life. It is exactly what I’ve aimed to seep into the artistic consciousness of people all over the world—that life is an art form.
HB: What is your home like?
LG: My “home” is a controversial topic. I don’t exactly have one. I live all over the world. I keep a small rental in New York, where I hang many of my hats when I come to see my parents and New York pals. It’s like a tiny jewel box, covered in rose-gold mirrors, with an oversize pink couch, an expensive vase, a white Marilyn piano, and a boudoir. I do not keep a lot of clothes here—mostly punk wear. And the three most expensive items I’ve ever purchased, including an actual house: my sable, a strand of diamonds, and my Mikimoto pearls.
HB: How do you think people in the future will feel about fashion right now?
LG: I’m not sure. I imagine that there will be a revival of some of these aesthetics—the more bold ones. Those who have watered down themselves for “sale” might make money now, but they are shortchanging their legend. I always think to myself, How do I want to be remembered? I don’t want to be remembered as anything but brave. The only good intention to make money is to help others. I want to be Oprah. I want to be Melinda Gates. If I ever sell products other than my talents, then it will be to give more to others.
HB: What excites you about the idea of performing in space?
LG: I honestly can’t wait. I can’t wait to design the performance. I’m auctioning off my second seat [on a Virgin Galactic flight] to raise money for the Born This Way Foundation. I want to make a moment that is about much more than me. Performing in space is such an honor. I want to challenge myself to come up with something that will not only bring everyone together but will also have a message of love that blasts into the beyond.

Read the full interview here: http://www.harpersbazaar.com/celebrity/news/lady-gaga-interview-0314

It’s not always easy being Lady Gaga—and in 2013, it was especially difficult. For the first time since she emerged from the New York City club ether in 2008, Planet Gaga seemed in peril. Her latest album, ARTPOP, an experimental R&B-tinged effort featuring artwork by Jeff Koons and a controversial duet with R. Kelly, divided critics. She also endured a very public split with her longtime manager, Troy Carter, just a week before the album’s release in November—all of which seemed to knock Gaga out of orbit. But 2014 is a new year, and Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta is a space oddity of a pop star. After a brief break around the holidays and some well-documented quality time with her boyfriend, Chicago Fire actor Taylor Kinney (and sporting some remarkable early-winter pantless ‘n’ plaid looks), Gaga is back to being her most inimitably Gaga, with a sparkling new Versace campaign and her upcoming ArtRave tour, which launches later this spring.

How does one account for such resilience, such triumphant unflappability, in the face of turmoil? Bazaar drew up a Proustian little Gaga questionnaire designed to reveal some of the secrets of her extraordinary Gaga-ness. The Lady kindly obliged by answering honestly and fabulously—and she did not disappoint.

HARPER’S BAZAAR: How have you changed in the past few years?

LADY GAGA: I’m actually not very different at all. I work all day, do research, sketch my ideas, prepare for performances. My experience with fame has been the opposite: “How can I stop this from changing me?” I mean I’m not broke anymore—that’s good! But today I’m more comfortable with being who I am. When I was younger, I felt pressure to become someone else once I became successful. But it’s the intention of the work that’s changed. I have fans now. I have a new purpose: to remind them that I am one of them, that we are one another. My consciousness has changed.

HB: What was the first big musical moment in your life?

LG: I went to see Phantom of the Opera with my grandma and my mom when I was very little. The stage, the voice, the music?…Composer Andrew Lloyd Webber has been a massive inspiration to me for some time—the storytelling, that deliciously somber undertone in his music. I just knew that he could see it while he was creating it. It is the same way I experience music.

HB: What’s your favorite outfit of all time?

LG: Audrey Hepburn at the derby in My Fair Lady—the giant white hat with flower detail and bonnet, a mermaid lace gown with a giant bow, and a walking stick. I’ve loved that since I was little. I’ll design something like that one day.

HB: Do you keep a lot of clothes that you’ve worn over the years?

LG: The fashion I’ve acquired over the years is so sacred to me—from costumes to couture, high fashion to punk wear I’ve collected from my secret international hot spots. I keep everything in an enormous archive in Hollywood. The clothes are on mannequins, also on hangers and in boxes with a photo of each piece, and there’s a Web site where I can go to look through everything. It’s too big—I could never sort through it myself! But these garments tell the stories of my life. And then there are the tour pieces. This is the section that is most sacred to me. These are the pieces that have collected energy, joy, and screams from fans all over the world. My fashion is my most prized possession for two reasons: 1) because it is a visualization of all the hard work I’ve put in to get where I am today; 2) because it is a legend to the encyclopedia of my life. It is exactly what I’ve aimed to seep into the artistic consciousness of people all over the world—that life is an art form.

HB: What is your home like?

LG: My “home” is a controversial topic. I don’t exactly have one. I live all over the world. I keep a small rental in New York, where I hang many of my hats when I come to see my parents and New York pals. It’s like a tiny jewel box, covered in rose-gold mirrors, with an oversize pink couch, an expensive vase, a white Marilyn piano, and a boudoir. I do not keep a lot of clothes here—mostly punk wear. And the three most expensive items I’ve ever purchased, including an actual house: my sable, a strand of diamonds, and my Mikimoto pearls.

HB: How do you think people in the future will feel about fashion right now?

LG: I’m not sure. I imagine that there will be a revival of some of these aesthetics—the more bold ones. Those who have watered down themselves for “sale” might make money now, but they are shortchanging their legend. I always think to myself, How do I want to be remembered? I don’t want to be remembered as anything but brave. The only good intention to make money is to help others. I want to be Oprah. I want to be Melinda Gates. If I ever sell products other than my talents, then it will be to give more to others.

HB: What excites you about the idea of performing in space?

LG: I honestly can’t wait. I can’t wait to design the performance. I’m auctioning off my second seat [on a Virgin Galactic flight] to raise money for the Born This Way Foundation. I want to make a moment that is about much more than me. Performing in space is such an honor. I want to challenge myself to come up with something that will not only bring everyone together but will also have a message of love that blasts into the beyond.

Read the full interview here: http://www.harpersbazaar.com/celebrity/news/lady-gaga-interview-0314